In almost every real estate transaction title work will be ordered and a title commitment will be provided to the parties to review prior to closing. A title commitment is a document that provides information pertaining to the property that is subject to the transaction. It will list out the various requirements, exceptions, and details of the title policy that will be issued for the property after closing. Since the title commitment provides valuable information pertaining to the property that a buyer may not otherwise know, it is extremely important to carefully review the title commitment before closing.

There are three sections of a title commitment that should be carefully reviewed. The first section is Schedule A. In this section, you will see information such as the type and amount of the policy, the proposed insured, the interest that the policy will cover, the current owner of the property and the legal description of the property. When reviewing this section, you will want to make sure the current owner and the seller are the same person/entity, the correct property is described and the proposed insured is listed exactly how the buyer plans on taking title. If there are any discrepancies, you will want to have the title commitment revised prior to closing and the title policy being issued.

The next section in the title commitment will be Schedule B-I. This section lists out all the requirements that must be satisfied before the title company will issue the title policy. Typically, you will see requirements such as a warranty deed transferring the property to the buyer, satisfactions of previous mortgages, etc. Additionally, if either of the parties are entities, there will likely be a requirement of documentation authorizing the entity to perform this transaction. It is important you understand both your requirements, as well as the other party’s requirements, so that all requirements are met prior to closing so that the transaction can proceed smoothly.

The last section in the title commitment that you should review is Schedule B-II. This section lists out the exceptions to coverage provided by the title policy. There are two types of exceptions that will be listed in this section. The first type is the general exceptions. These exceptions are in every title commitment and can often be removed if certain actions are taken. The other type of exceptions are the specific exceptions. These are exceptions that are specifically connected to the property in the transaction. One example of a specific exception would be a prior mortgage on the property. Assuming the mortgage would be satisfied at closing, this exception would then be removed from the title commitment. Because these exceptions can cause a lack of coverage in the future if an issue arises, it is crucial that the buyer review each exception.

Taking into consideration the importance of the title commitment in the execution of a real estate transaction, it will be helpful to seek the advice of a real estate attorney prior to closing. A real estate attorney will be able to review each section of the title commitment and determine if there are any discrepancies or items that need to be revised. Moreover, an attorney will be able to analyze each exception to the title policy and advise you on the impact each exception has on the property. Overall, seeking the help of a real estate attorney to review the title commitment prior to closing can facilitate a smooth transaction and prevent future issues that may arise as a result of an overlooked item on the title commitment.

 

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