A Seller’s “right to cure” does not mean that the Seller must cure any defects uncovered during a home inspection. Rather, a Seller’s “right to cure” means that the Seller simply has the option to cure a defect once the Buyer notifies the Seller that there are defects to which the Buyer objects.

When the Buyer provides notice of defects to the Seller, the Buyer must include a copy of the inspection report and a list of the defects to which the Buyer objects. After delivering the inspection report and the objectionable defects to the Seller, the Seller may elect to cure such defects. If the Seller elects to cure the defects, then the Seller shall deliver written notice to the Buyer stating that the Seller is electing to cure the defects.

If Seller does not wish to elect to cure the defects, the Seller may deliver notice to the Buyer stating that the Seller will not cure the defects. The Seller also could do nothing after receiving Buyer’s notice of defects. If the Seller does nothing or delivers a notice to the Buyer stating that the Seller will not cure the defects, then the Offer to Purchase will be null and void, and the Buyer should receive its earnest money back. In conclusion, a “right to cure” does not mean that the Seller must cure any defects; it simply gives the Seller the option to cure defects.

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