Do Pedestrians Have the Right-of-Way?

Do Pedestrians Have the Right-of-Way?

I recently heard someone say as they confidently stepped off a curb into the street, “In Wisconsin, cars have to stop for us. Pedestrians always have the right-of-way.” Having grown up in Michigan, where our rules of the road have their own oddities (look up a “Michigan Left” for an example), I was not sure if this stranger was correct or not. As I am an attorney and looking into and analyzing laws is part of my job, I thought I would do some investigation into this matter. So, before you confidently step out into the street, please read below to learn more about the Wisconsin Statutes for pedestrians crossing the street.

The statutes are broken into three categories based on if there are traffic lights and if there is a crosswalk.

  1. When the crosswalk is in combination with traffic lights, the rules are transparent. Pedestrians have the right-of-way when a green light or walk signal indicate that it is appropriate for a pedestrian to cross, especially if the pedestrian is already in the crosswalk. Pedestrians also have the right of way when walking on a sidewalk where an alley or driveway crosses the sidewalk. Vehicles must wait for pedestrians to cross the alley or driveway before entering or exiting. While this does not specifically disprove the stranger I overheard, it is already not looking good for their legal proclamation.
  1. If there is a crosswalk, but no traffic light, the pedestrian still has the right-of-way, but with a significant caveat; pedestrians cannot suddenly leave the curb or sidewalk and cross the street if it would be difficult for the approaching vehicle to yield. What stands out to me about this caveat, is that the pedestrian must do a mental calculation as to how quickly a vehicle can brake in order to determine who has the right-of-way. This is no longer as transparent as before, because it is impossible to tell how well a particular vehicle’s brakes are working. At this point the stranger’s proclamation about pedestrian’s always having the right of way has another serious strike against it.
  1. Lastly, to further disprove the stranger’s theory, when crossing a road in a location other than a crosswalk, pedestrians MUST yield to all vehicles. Meaning unless traveling on a crosswalk or a sidewalk, vehicles have the right-of-way.

While my story ended with everyone making it across the street safely, that is not always the case. Many drivers are becoming more and more distracted and unfortunately the expectation of paying attention falls on the pedestrian. Remember to look both ways, obey all crossing signals and cross at a crosswalk if possible.

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